Alistair Bridges

Senior Associate
Practice areas
Competition and regulatory
International trade
Public and administrative law
Manufacturing and supply chain

Alistair is a senior associate with Moulis Legal and is a key member of the firm’s international trade practice as well as the manager of Moulis Legal’s Melbourne office.

Alistair is a key resource for our clients in the handling of major trade, commercial and cross-border matters, and in administrative law, including Federal Court review of government action.

Alistair has significant experience in international trade law matters, including anti-dumping and countervailing investigations, safeguards investigations, customs valuations and classifications, export controls/sanctions compliance, complex domestic and cross-border commercial transactions and judicial review litigation. His strong skills in research, legislative interpretation, development of legal argumentation and strategy and legal drafting, and his thorough understanding of the commercial, societal and political context in which his clients operate, allow him to provide thorough and nuanced representation and advice.

In recognition of his experience, Alistair is acknowledged as an “Associate to Watch” in the International Law/WTO arena by Chambers & Partners. He was recognised as one of Australia’s 21 most outstanding young lawyers by The Australian newspaper and is listed as a leading export control and sanctions expert by the Journal of Export Controls and Sanctions.

Alistair is a Specialist in Administrative Law accredited by the Law Institute of Victoria. He has a Masters Degree (with Merit) in Laws specialising in international law, and a Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice (with Merit) both from the Australian National University. As well, he has a Bachelor of Economics (majoring in economic analysis) and a Bachelor Degree in Law (with Honours) from the University of Tasmania. He is admitted to the Supreme Court of Victoria.

Before commencing at Moulis Legal, Alistair completed the Australian Tax Office graduate program, where he received a great deal of technical experience in tax affairs and the workings of government. He was exposed to both the policy side of the agency’s responsibilities and the legal implementation of those policies. Most notably, he worked in the team responsible for the agency’s implementation of the Future Tax System Review.

During his time at the University of Tasmania, Alistair held the office of Careers and Social Justice Officer for the Tasmanian University Law Society, and Australian Legal Education Forum Co-ordinator for the Australian Law Student Association Committee. In between these commitments he also acted as a freelance writer and radio host for Edge Radio.

In his free time Alistair enjoys reading, going to concerts and Scotch. He appreciates, and makes, a good coffee. One day, soon, he will learn to play the guitar.

Knowledge pieces by Alistair Bridges
Nuclear waste debate re-emerges in Australia

Australia has long debated the notion that it could be a significant repository for the warehousing and containment of the world’s nuclear waste. That possibility has re-emerged, with the State Government of South Australia again considering a proposal to build a nuclear waste disposal facility in its remote desert environs.

Iran back in vogue

Australia’s exports to the Islamic Republic of Iran were, at one time, valued at over AUD 1 billion and covered a range of industrial and consumer goods and services. After years of nuclear based sanctions, Australia’s total trade and investment with Iran is valued at less than AUD 300 million and is limited to wheat and related products. In the last two months the United Nations and Australia have eased many of the sanctions against Iran, which will open new trade and investment opportunities for Australian businesses looking to Iran as a potential market.

Australian export sanctions – new suspend and snap-back powers

An amendment to Australia’s export sanctions regulations will give the Minister for Foreign Affairs greater flexibility in amending the scope and application of autonomous sanctions. For businesses doing business in or with any of the 10 regions to which Australia has currently applied autonomous sanctions, these new powers mean that certain actions and activities potentially can be withdrawn from the scope of the existing sanctions regime.

Before you hit “send” – does your email require an export licence?

Enforcement of Australia’s key military and dual-use goods export legislation – the Defence Trade Controls Act 2012 (“DTCA”) – has been pushed back by another year, until 2 April 2016. Businesses should take advantage of this delay to get acquainted with Australia’s new, US-inspired export control system, to ensure that they do not run afoul of these new, broad-reaching licensing requirements.

Senate launches inquiry into non-conforming building products

This week the Australian Senate has referred an inquiry into non-conforming building products to the Senate Economics References Committee. The committee’s report is due on 12 October 2015. The terms of reference require the committee to investigate the economic impact of non-conforming products, and their impact on safety, costs and quality of construction.

Changes to environmental impact study requirements in the ACT

According to the 2010 Scorecard of Red Tape Reform released by the Australian Business Council, the Australian Capital Territory (“ACT”) is the worst jurisdiction in Australia for “red tape” in business regulation. This is particularly evident in property development and construction, which is an industry of very considerable importance to the ACT’s economy. Whilst the community recognises that importance, it also values Canberra’s natural environment and the maintenance of good urban amenity, which are major drawcards of living and working in Canberra.