News

Queensland ethanol mandate discussion paper released

19.06.2015

The Queensland Government has released its discussion paper proposing the introduction of an ethanol mandate in Queensland. The discussion paper – Towards a Clean Energy Economy: Achieving a Biofuel Mandate for Queensland – sets out the parameters of the proposed system. It announces the Government’s preference for a 2% ethanol mandate commencing on 1 July 2016.

We have previously discussed the impact of these controversial changes in our Energy and Resources update Queensland Parliament moves closer towards an ethanol mandate (link here).

Moulis Legal’s Christopher Hewitt stated:

“The introduction of an ethanol mandate will result in regulatory compliance requirements for the downstream fuel industry.

 The Queensland Government’s discussion paper includes initial information but there are many details still to be determined, including the coverage of the mandate, enforcement and new infrastructure requirements.

 Infrastructure for service stations and other compliance costs will be significant.

 Environmental risks relating to the installation of new underground storage tanks will need to be assessed and managed within the framework of Queensland’s contaminated land regulations.”

A copy of the discussion paper is available here. The Queensland Government has invited interested parties to make any submissions on the discussion paper by 5pm on Friday 3 July 2015.

Moulis Legal’s petroleum law team advises Australian and international businesses on downstream petroleum issues, including production, trade, sales and distribution, regulatory compliance, land contamination, and the management and transfer of petroleum assets. For more information, please contact Christopher Hewitt or Lauren Gray on +61 7 3367 6900 or christopher.hewitt@moulislegal.com and lauren.gray@moulislegal.com.

 

This memo presents an overview and commentary of the subject matter. It is not provided in the context of a solicitor-client relationship and no duty of care is assumed or accepted. It does not constitute legal advice